Tag Archives: IPSF

Nigerian IPSF CP hosts first Pharmacy Profession Awareness Campaign

By Isah Dahiru

Theme: Pharmacy; My Career of Choice

The choice of a career is one of life’s biggest decisions, as we live in exciting times where there is the quintessential adjustments and flexibility to career requirements. The career of an aspiring college applicant is a substantial index of envisaged success, measured in monetary value.

Career pathways in Nigeria has been precursored by acquiring a related university degree or picking skills and internship opportunities that can offer valuable and lasting experiences. The likelihood of enjoying a successful career begins by planning a degree that is in line with your career choice.

The orientation program is aimed to enlighten secondary school pupils and to educate them about the uniqueness, beauty and opportunity in the profession. Indirectly the community’s concept of pharmacy as a profession can be properly defined. This project is designed to cover 21 schools over a period of ten (10) months in each state with a School of Pharmacy.

We started this program with Ahmadu Bello University, School of Basic and Remedial Studies, SBRS-ABU Funtua in Katsina State of Nigeria. The guest speaker was Pharm. Ahmed Mohammed Gana, who delivered the speech to over 700 students in attendance.

The career talks focuses on:

Harnessing of skills and interest.

As skills are the perceptible abilities we possess as humans, and interests are the direction we lead our abilities to. You may have a skill or interest in science related career but the tragedy of the Nigerian state not viably commercialising end products of science is a huge setback. You might decide to settle for a degree in Arts, Social and Management Sciences because having such a degree is enterprising. Doing this might harm your career path as even when you acquire the degree, the career becomes unfulfilling irrespective of accolades and wealth amassed. You must have found it difficult making adjustments in areas where you don’t have natural abilities and interests.

The students were asked to define their career goal.

Average university degree seeker is between the ages 15-18 years in Nigeria. It might appear rather vague to expect life or career goals from such young persons. Success in today’s contemporary generation is not restricted to age. We have teenagers who have made revolutionary impact not by chance or parental leverage, but because they set career goals early in life. You need clarity and purpose on what you want to achieve with your interest and career to enable you choose a degree that promotes your goals.

Finally, in a competitive Nigerian market a related university degree is a requirement in most career fields. Employers rarely get attracted to talents alone, the degree is a proof that you understand the tenets and ethics. As much as interest and experience is required, putting your university degree on the same graphical axis with your career goal makes the future promising, and pharmacy is one of the profession like no other in this planet earth, as it provides ethics and job opportunities by growing the economy.

Mr. Isah is from Auyo Local Government of Jigawa State Nigeria. He’s currently studying pharmacy (400l) in Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, and the IPSF Contact Person for PANS, Nigeria cp.pans@gmail.com

 

This is what I’d like to tell you about me joining IPSF: It’s been AWESOME!

By Temitope Ben-Ajepe

.and I’m not saying that just because I can. Writing this has done a great job of evoking deep rooted nostalgia and I’m happy to say that I really don’t mind.

The mere act of talking (or more aptly put, writing in this case) about my IPSF experience fills me up with the fondest memories that I’ll forever cherish in my pharmaceutical career and ignites hope of an even better and more rewarding experience in the course of what’s left in my sojourn as a student pharmacist through the genius that is the International Pharmaceutical Students’ Federation (IPSF).

For one thing, I discovered IPSF at an all time low and while it would be insincere to say it changed my life (or at least, not yet), it gave me a fresh perspective on a lot of pharmaceutical things. At that point, reading about pharmacy was drab and unexciting and I believed my life held more promise elsewhere and I couldn’t wait to leave school immediately after my finals. Everything about pharmacy deeply infuriated me and I wanted nothing more than to be done with it in the long haul and for the short run and to greatly reduce all unnecessary exposure to it.

I more or less stumbled on IPSF through a dear friend,who’s now a pharmacist and ex-student of our great Igbinedion University, who sent me a soft copy of the flyer for a Leaders-In-Training event planned to be held here at school during the summer of 2016 and while the techie in me was already gearing up to fly to Abuja for the coolest internship I had snagged at the Office for ICT Innovation and Entrepreneurship, it was the name Seun Omobo that did it for me. I knew who she was and the great work she had done at WHO and was what you’d call a fan. I am fascinated by the woman as I think she’s phenomenal and with a little tweaking to my already set plans, I found myself on a bus to Okada to finally meet her before proceeding to Abuja from Benin.

By the time I got to Okada, Seun had already made her address. And left. And I was, for lack of a better term, devastated. My whole detour had been a waste of time, money and effort. Or so I thought.

I ended up staying and thoroughly enjoying myself even though I was forced to hole up at the dingy “Princess” motel. It was at that event I came to realize just how multidisciplinary pharmacy practice truly was and how I could align my skills and interests with my pharmacy background to work in so many new, exciting fields. Pharmacy didn’t have to be restricted to community or hospital and that was all I needed to know to get me pumped for it.

The people I met in the facilitators nailed an already closed coffin in case I changed my mind. They were smart, precise and had good heads on their shoulders. We conversed and I knew that this was something I wanted to be a part of; exciting, fresh and making a lot of sense.

It’s been only under a year and I’ve made really amazing friends within and outside the country who are as ambitious as myself and with whom I could always consult for their input on specific matters. I am continuously amazed how so many amazing and super smart people (read: pharmacists and student pharmacists) can aggregate all in one place. And it’s not all just about the book smarts, they’re street savvy and widely traveled and really, really cool. I am forever grateful for the friends from whose wealth of experience I can drink from and see the world through their eyes. The deeply cerebral talks and light-hearted, witty banter, I take none of it for granted. At all.

I’ve had the opportunity of engaging in events, from organizing medical outreaches in collaboration with The United States State Department to the  Professional Development approved ones for Patient Counseling and Clinical Skills; being actively involved in the groundwork and writing reports and making commendations. I’ve also coordinated an aggressive, Nationwide online Campaign on Antimicrobial Resistance that was duly recognized by the Federation.

For one who loves the road, I’ve been opportune to travel to other faculties of pharmacy for knowledge sharing programs and it’s been nothing short of exhilarating. There’s an inside joke about how IPSF is a sort of travel agency but and slowly but surely, it’s beginning to make sense. Never mind that it’s at your own expense. But the experiences are worth it all.

And I’m just getting started.

The writer is an aspiring pharmacist and wordsmith. Interested in mobile health, big data and tweets from @temi_benjamin.    

 

Based on logistics: Who wants to spend summer in West Africa?

By Aniekan Ekpenyong

Oya, here’s the plan. You would touch down in Abuja (Nigeria) from the 25th – 30th of June for the 1st West African IPSF Trainers Development Camp (TDC)! Immediately after that, you would take a long bus ride from Abuja – Kumasi for the IPSF Leaders in Training (LIT) event where you may get to train leaders from different parts of Africa as well as attend the 6th African Pharmaceutical Symposium AfPS (Go for Gold!).

For those having phobia for long trips and buses, worry not! It’s less than 2 hours by air from Abuja to Accra (sounds good huh?)

You’ve been watching lots of videos regarding “Naija jollof” and “Ghanaian jollof.” Biko, come and have the real taste in Abuja so that when you arrive in Ghana, you can be the judge! (Omo, see bad belle...). Jollof  is a one-pot rice dish popular in many West African countries.

Nigerian Jollof Rice (Internet Photo)

What more can I say? In a span of 5 days, you get the chance to experience the Nigerian culture, cuisine and the warmth of her people. You get to engage with different participants through different sessions and unique training styles especially crafted for you.

I hear someone ask what the benefits of the TDC are. Oga Sir, I am at your service:

– Lifetime opportunity of being an IPSF trainer gbam!

-Opportunity to develop the IPSF training program by effectively delivering soft skills trainings at IPSF event both home and abroad gbam!

-Personal development on soft skills gbam!

-Attend first, every other things shall be added (full stop!)

Furthermore, you don’t have to worry about the stress associated with payment transactions as you get to pay on arrival! Simple enough? I love that smile!

If you haven’t tasted the Nigerian ‘Kilishi’ or ‘Suya’, you are still a learner! (Ooops, did I say anything 🙊). Oya, if you know what is good for you eh, better don’t miss our ‘Kilishi evening of joy’

I talk too much. I know. You made me do so. I won’t say anything again until you drop what you are doing and look at this document.

In the meantime, thank you for your attention. Let me come and be going 🚶🏽🚶🏽🚶🏽🚶🏽🚶🏽.

Disclaimer: This post is mainly for IPSFers passionate about fostering professionalism in others and are willing to contribute to the IPSF training program by sharing knowledge gained through organization of trainings and development of training programs.

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Here are a few words to learn from the Igbo, the third dominant Nigerian language.

Biko – Please

Oya – Let’s get it on.

Bad belle – To hold a grudge

Omo – Buddy

Gbam – A loud bang usually made in agreement.

Oga – Informal for boss